John Smith of Alabama – Revolutionary War Soldier

John Smith was listed as a (Revolutionary War) pensioner living in the household of Larkin Smith on the 1840 Jackson County, Alabama census report. (The 1840 census reports had the heads of households listed on one page and the slaves and pensioners’ names listed on the 2nd page) – See census report images below. Larkin Smith was the male listed between the ages of 40 and 50. That put his birth year approximately between 1790-1800.  John Smith was listed as the male between the ages of 70-80. That put his birth year approximately between 1760-1770, however, on the  second page of the census report, John Smith’s age was listed as 77, therefore he was born about 1763. John Smith’s wife must have also still been living at the time the census was taken because there was also a female in the household between 70 and 80 years old.
I found the Revolutionary War Pension application of John Smith in Heritage Quest online’s Revolutionary War database. It is contained in file number S14488 in NARA film series M508, roll 750, and it contains 7 pages. I suspected the John Smith on the 1840 census was from the NC-GA-TN area, so I read through every pension application for “John Smith” for these states. The John Smith listed in File no. S14488 under North Carolina was reported to be living in Jackson County, Alabama at the time the pension was filed (between 1830-1840), so I knew he was our guy.

According to his pension application, John Smith was born 15 Mar 1763 in Anson County, North Carolina. He enlisted in the regular army in 1778 at the home of his father in Anson County. He served five years. He removed to Georgia about 1803, then to Tennessee about 1811 and then to Madison County (near Jackson County), Alabama about 1832.

John Smith was allowed a pension from his application filed 21 Feb 1833 while living near Brownsboro in Madison County, Alabama. Click the following link to see a PDF of the scanned pension application containing 7 pages.

Revolutionary War Pension Application of John Smith

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